FOR VETERINARIANS

ALICAM offers a unique opportunity for veterinarians to deliver more effective care by increasing their ability to accurately identify diseases with a client-friendly, cost-effective solution.

Meet the Internists

Jill Pomrantz
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Jill earned her veterinary degree from the University of California, Davis. She completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the Animal Medical Center in New York City and then returned to UC Davis for a residency in small animal internal medicine. After her residency, she worked at Columbia University’s Institute of Comparative Medicine as the Chief of Comparative Medicine and was the Medical Director and Staff Internist at the ASPCA in New York City. She currently works at Infiniti Medical as the Director of Medical Affairs, where she focuses primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of GI diseases.

Jill Pomrantz
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Jill earned her veterinary degree from the University of California, Davis. She completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the Animal Medical Center in New York City and then returned to UC Davis for a residency in small animal internal medicine. After her residency, she worked at Columbia University’s Institute of Comparative Medicine as the Chief of Comparative Medicine and was the Medical Director and Staff Internist at the ASPCA in New York City. She currently works at Infiniti Medical as the Director of Medical Affairs, where she focuses primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of GI diseases.

Mike Willard
DVM, MS, DACVIM (SAIM)

Mike is a 1975 graduate of the Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine.  He completed his internship and Masters degree at Kansas State University and his internal medicine residency at Michigan State University. After that, Dr. Willard held faculty appointments at Michigan State University, Mississippi State University, and now at Texas A&M University.  He has also consulted and worked at a private referral practice.  He is currently a professor of Small Animal Clinical Science and specializes in gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreatology and endoscopy (flexible and rigid). Dr. Willard has given over 3,000 hours of post-graduate continuing education lectures (nationally and internationally), has over 80 refereed publications, and has over 130 book chapters in print.  He has worked extensively on sled dogs as well as with the World Small Animal Veterinary Association GI biopsy workgroup. He is currently an Associate editor for the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

Mike Willard
DVM, MS, DACVIM (SAIM)

Mike is a 1975 graduate of the Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine.  He completed his internship and Masters degree at Kansas State University and his internal medicine residency at Michigan State University. After that, Dr. Willard held faculty appointments at Michigan State University, Mississippi State University, and now at Texas A&M University.  He has also consulted and worked at a private referral practice.  He is currently a professor of Small Animal Clinical Science and specializes in gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreatology and endoscopy (flexible and rigid). Dr. Willard has given over 3,000 hours of post-graduate continuing education lectures (nationally and internationally), has over 80 refereed publications, and has over 130 book chapters in print.  He has worked extensively on sled dogs as well as with the World Small Animal Veterinary Association GI biopsy workgroup. He is currently an Associate editor for the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

Brian Hardy
DVM, MS, DACVIM (SAIM)

Brian earned his veterinary degree from the University of Minnesota. He completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at The Ohio State University, followed by a combined small animal internal medicine residency and Master’s degree program at the University of Minnesota. Prior to joining UC Davis as a Staff Veterinarian in Internal Medicine, Dr. Hardy worked in private practice in Santa Cruz, California, and then at Infiniti Medical. His areas of clinical interest are infectious and immune-mediated diseases, endocrine disorders, minimally invasive procedures and gastroenterology.

Brian Hardy
DVM, MS, DACVIM (SAIM)

Brian earned his veterinary degree from the University of Minnesota. He completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at The Ohio State University, followed by a combined small animal internal medicine residency and Master’s degree program at the University of Minnesota. Prior to joining UC Davis as a Staff Veterinarian in Internal Medicine, Dr. Hardy worked in private practice in Santa Cruz, California, and then at Infiniti Medical. His areas of clinical interest are infectious and immune-mediated diseases, endocrine disorders, minimally invasive procedures and gastroenterology.

Sean Yoshimoto
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Sean received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California Davis. He completed an internship at VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, and returned for a residency in internal medicine at UC Davis. He is currently a staff internist at VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital. In addition to his clinical duties, he is also the director of the rotating internship and internal medicine residency programs.

Sean Yoshimoto
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Sean received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California Davis. He completed an internship at VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, and returned for a residency in internal medicine at UC Davis. He is currently a staff internist at VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital. In addition to his clinical duties, he is also the director of the rotating internship and internal medicine residency programs.

Tracy Hill
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM), PhD, DECVIM-CA

Tracy attended undergraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor’s in Biology.  She then obtained a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Minnesota in 2005. After completing an internship and small animal internal medicine residency training at North Carolina State University, she was awarded a Diplomate in Small Animal Internal Medicine from ACVIM. After completing specialty training, Tracy obtained a PhD in gastrointestinal physiology from North Carolina State University.  For her research, she developed an ex vivo model of acid injury to canine gastric mucosa using the Ussing chamber system to study gastrointestinal permeability. Tracy also completed Fellowship training in Veterinary Interventional Radiology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. She then took a post as senior lecturer at the University of Edinburgh in 2012 through 2016 in the Small Animal Medicine and Interventional Radiology.  She is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia in the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery as part of the Small Animal Medicine and Interventional Radiology services. Her research interests are in gastrointestinal diseases and the effect of critical illness on gastrointestinal health as well as developing and improving non-invasive treatments through the Interventional Radiology service.

Tracy Hill
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM), PhD, DECVIM-CA

Tracy attended undergraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor’s in Biology.  She then obtained a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Minnesota in 2005. After completing an internship and small animal internal medicine residency training at North Carolina State University, she was awarded a Diplomate in Small Animal Internal Medicine from ACVIM. After completing specialty training, Tracy obtained a PhD in gastrointestinal physiology from North Carolina State University.  For her research, she developed an ex vivo model of acid injury to canine gastric mucosa using the Ussing chamber system to study gastrointestinal permeability. Tracy also completed Fellowship training in Veterinary Interventional Radiology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. She then took a post as senior lecturer at the University of Edinburgh in 2012 through 2016 in the Small Animal Medicine and Interventional Radiology.  She is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia in the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery as part of the Small Animal Medicine and Interventional Radiology services. Her research interests are in gastrointestinal diseases and the effect of critical illness on gastrointestinal health as well as developing and improving non-invasive treatments through the Interventional Radiology service.

Dr. Joseph Bisignano
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Joe attended New York University and graduated with a degree in Psychology and Biochemistry before attending and completing veterinary school at Western University of Health Sciences. He completed a small animal medicine and surgical internship at VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital and a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Minnesota. He became boarded in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2014 and returned to VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital as a staff internist. He has a strong interest in gastroenterology and has been involved in numerous research projects investing the molecular mechanisms involved in canine inflammatory bowel disease. Joe also has an interest in marine mammal medicine and has worked extensively with Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins and California Sea Lions at the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program and Dolphin Quest Hawaii.

Dr. Joseph Bisignano
DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Joe attended New York University and graduated with a degree in Psychology and Biochemistry before attending and completing veterinary school at Western University of Health Sciences. He completed a small animal medicine and surgical internship at VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital and a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Minnesota. He became boarded in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2014 and returned to VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital as a staff internist. He has a strong interest in gastroenterology and has been involved in numerous research projects investing the molecular mechanisms involved in canine inflammatory bowel disease. Joe also has an interest in marine mammal medicine and has worked extensively with Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins and California Sea Lions at the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program and Dolphin Quest Hawaii.

Case Studies

  • 10 y.o. MC Schipperke with Anemia

    History:

    -Lethargy
    -Began vomiting 2 weeks prior to presentation after stopping cyclosporine for historical meningitis
    -Noted to be anemic for 1 month
    -Medications: prednisone 1mg/kg/day, ferrous sulfate

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Hct 19%, normocytic (MCV 63.2, normal 63.0), hypochromic, reticulocytes 100,000, Mct 19% (MCV 63.2 fl, normal 63.0 fl)

    Chemistry panel: normal
    Abdominal ultrasound: Diffuse hepatopathy
    Thoracic radiographs: Unremarkable

    Problem List:

    -Borderline microcytic hypochromic regenerative anemia
    -Vomiting
    -Historical meningitis

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 34,841
    -Study Time: 16.2h
    -Esophagus: normal
    -Gastric transit time: 4.6h (mildly prolonged)
    -SI transit time: 1.74h (normal)

     

    Findings:

    -Irregular mucosa, Small erosions with hemorrhage
    -Small Intestinal findings: Ulcerated jejunal mass (pictures and video)
    -Colon: Normal

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy1_Img1_Gastric erosions with irregular mucosaGastric erosions with irregular mucosa

    CaseStudy1_Img2_Beginning of jejunal massBeginning of Jejunal Mass

    CaseStudy1_Img3_Ulcerated jejunal massUlcerated Jejunal Mass

    CaseStudy1_Img4_Colon
    Colon

  • 10 y.o. MC Boxer with Acute GI Bleeding

    History:

    -Cutaneous mast cell tumors years ago
    -Melena 4 days before presentation
    -Collapsed the day prior with PCV/TP 13%/3.0
    -Post-transfusion PCV 29%
    -Medications: famotidine, sucralfate

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Regenerative anemia (Hct 13%, reticulocytes 68,800)
    Ultrasound: Normal

    Problem list:

    -Anemia with melena

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 27,668
    -Study Time: 15h
    -Gastric transit time: 11.3h (Prolonged)
    -SI transit time: 1.6h

     

    Findings

    -Irregular gastric mucosa with erosions
    -At least 1 polyploid lesion with evidence of active bleeding
    -Large gastric hematoma
    -Normal SI mucosa
    -Colon: Normal

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#2_Img1_Gastric polyp with bleedingGastric Polyp With Bleeding

    CaseStudy#2_Img2_Gastric polyp with bleedingGastric Polyp With Bleeding 2

    CaseStudy#2_Img3_Gastric polyp with bleedingGastric Polyp With Bleeding 3

    CaseStudy#2_img4_HematomaHematoma

    CaseStudy#2_Img5_Endoscopy
    Endoscopy

  • 7 y.o. MI Cocker Spaniel with Panhypoproteinemia

    History:

    -Weight loss, lethargy, diarrhea , tenesmus for several months
    -Responded to steroids, then tapered off
    -Diet: Royal Canin Low Fat
    -Medications: tylosin 1/8 tsp PO q12h, cobalamine injections

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Normal
    Chemistry panel: Panhypoproteinemia
    Fecal float: Negative
    TLI/Folate: normal
    Cobalamine: low
    CPL: elevated
    Baseline Cortisol: normal
    Abdominal ultrasound: Normal, other than ascites

    Problem list:

    -Diarrhea with panhypoproteinemia
    -Elevated cPL
    -Nonregenerative anemia
    -Hypocobalaminemia
    -Ascites

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 10,618
    -Study Time: 6.6h
    -Gastric transit time: 51 mins (normal)
    -SI transit time: 1.58h (normal)

     

    Findings: 
    -Diffusely irregular gastric mucosa with several erosions and small hemorrhages
    -Diffusely abnormal small intestine with irregular mucosa and scattered erosions throughout
    -Many dilated lacteals throughout the duodenum and jejunum
    -Suspected colonic erosions and blood clots mixed in with the feces

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy3_Img1_Irregular gastric mucosa with erosionGastric Mucosa With Erosion

    CaseStudy3_Img2_Irregular duodenal mucosaIrregular Duodenal Mucosa

    CaseStudy3_Img3_Dilated lacteals in duodenumDilated Lacteals in Duodenum

    CaseStudy3_Img4_Dilated lacteals in jejunumDilated Lacteals in Jejunum

    CaseStudy3_Img5_Irregular and thickened jejunal mucosaIrregular and Thickened Jejunal Mucosa

    CaseStudy3_Img6_ColonColon

  • 1 y.o. MC Border Collie with Chronic Diarrhea

    History:

    -Chronic mixed bowel diarrhea
    -Occasional hematochezia
    -Severe weight loss (BCS 2/9)
    -Appetite waxes and wanes
    -No vomiting
    -Diet: Adult Maintenance
    -Medications: multiple rounds of metronidazole, tylosin unknown dose, vitamin B12 injections weekly, panacur q24 x 10 days for empiric deworming, prednisone q12h

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: nonregenerative anemia (Hct 30%), eosinophilia
    Chemistry panel: Hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia (TP 3.7, Alb 2.0, Glob 1.7), decreased cobalamine (194) and folate (7), normal TLI

    Problem list:

    -Chronic mixed bowel diarrhea
    -Hypoproteinemia
    -Hypoalbuminemia
    -Eosinophilia
    -Decreased cobalamine and folate

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 35,082
    -Study Time: 15.8h
    -Gastric transit time: 3.8h (mildly prolonged)
    -SI transit time: 5.3h (prolonged)

     

    Findings

    -Stomach: patchy areas of erythema and irregularity of the mucosa with a few pinpoint erosions
    -Small intestine: moderately to markedly irregularity of the mucosa (especially in the proximal half of the SI), with several small nodular lesions with depressed, ulcerated centers. A number of focal erosions are seen, several linear hemorrhagic lesions and a few dilated lacteals.
    -Colon: Majority of mucosa obscured by feces, hemorrhagic lesion in proximal colon

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#4_Img1_ irregular and erythematous gastric mucosaIrregular and Erythematous Gastric Mucosa
    CaseStudy#4_Img2_ duodenal nodular lesionDuodenal Nodular Lesion
    CaseStudy#4_Img3_ Duodenal nodular lesion (short arrow) and erosion (long arrow)Duodenal Nodular Lesion (short arrow) and Erosion (long arrow)
    CaseStudy#4_Img4_ Linear hemorrhagic lesions and irregular mucosa in proximal SILinear Hemorrhagic Lesions and Irregular Mucosa in Proximal SI
    CaseStudy#4_Img5_ SI linear hemorrhagic lesionSI Linear Hemorrhagic Lesion
    CaseStudy#4_Img6_ SI erosion or ulcerSI Erosion or Ulcer
    CaseStudy#4_Img7_ dilated lactealsDilated Lacteals
    CaseStudy#4_Img8_ hemorrhagic lesion in proximal colonHemorrhagic Lesion in Proximal Colon
  • 4 y.o. MC Golden Retriever with Chronic Vomiting and Diarrhea

    History:

    -Chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhea
    -Had gastrotomy 1 year prior, with removal of gastric trichobezoar
    -Medications: medrol, famotidine, Omeprazole, ondansetron, tylan, sertraline, azathioprine

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Normal
    Chemistry panel: Normal
    Elevated TLI
    Elevated spec cPL
    Negative fecal OP/G and PCR
    Normal cobalamine and folate

    Problem list:

    -Chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhea
    -Mildly elevated spec cPL

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 28,920
    -Study Time: 12h
    -Gastric transit time: 6.9h (prolonged)
    -SI transit time: 1.2h (normal)

     

    Findings

    -Stomach: Prolonged gastric transit time. Irregular area in the antrum that is concerning for a mass. On some frames, it appears that the mass may be attached to a stalk, but this is not definitive. Some patchy irregular gastric mucosa is seen as well.
    -Small intestine: Irregular/thickened mucosa in the duodenum and patches of mildly irregular mucosa and some mucosal fissures seen in the jejunum and ileum.
    -
Colon: The colonic mucosa is completely obscured by feces.

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#5_Img1_suspect pedunculated gastric massSuspect Pedunculated Gastric Mass
    CaseStudy#5_Img2_suspect gastric massSuspect Gastric Mass
    CaseStudy#5_Img3_irregular duodenal mucosaIrregular Duodenal Mucosa
    CaseStudy#5_Img4_irregular_thickened jejunal mucosaIrregular Thickened Jejunal Mucosa
  • 7 y.o. FS Portuguese Water Dog with Chronic Vomiting and Diarrhea

    History:

    -Chronic vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite
    -Diagnosed with IBD and PLE based on previous endoscopy 3 months prior
    -Moderate response to therapy initially, however recurrence of weight loss, lethargy and poor appetite noted frequently.
    -Medications: prednisone, metronidazole, famotidine, ondansetron, cyclosporine, mirtazapine

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Normal
    Chemistry Panel: Elevated liver enzymes, hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia

     

    Previous Diagnostics:

    -ACTH Stim: Normal

    -Ultrasound: slightly rounded liver with mottling – suspicious for early fibrosis
    thickened gastric wall (1cm)
    fluid-filled bowel loops and enlarged mesenteric lymph node (3x1cm), ultrasound-guided liver biopsy

    -Gastroduodenoscopy:
    Stomach: very cobblestoned, edematous appearance. Multiple areas of splotchy red with some erosions – incisura, cardia, fundus all affected.
    Duodenum: severely friable and granular. Multiple nodular areas with erosions throughout

    -Biopsies
    Stomach: Moderate to severe lymphocytic, plasmacytic and neutrophilic gastritis with areas of erosion
    Duodenum: Severe, erosive, plasmacytic, lymphocytic, neutrophilic and eosinophilic enteritis with glandular hyperplasia
    Moderate cholangiohepatitis with mild multifocal hepatocellular vacuolar change

    Problem list:

    -History of previously diagnosed IBD and PLE with recurrence of clinical signs

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 28,797
    -Study Time: 13.8h
    -Esophageal time: 9 sec (normal)
    -Gastric transit time: 6.1h (prolonged)
    -SI transit time: 2.1h (normal)

     

    Findings:

    -Esophagus: Normal
    -Stomach: Prolonged gastric transit time. Many areas with erosions, some of which are large, as well as several hematomas and a few nodular areas. In other areas, the mucosa is irregular, with a cobblestone appearance. At the pyloroduodenal junction, linear areas of erosion/ulceration and bleeding are seen.
    -Small intestine: Diffusely irregular duodenal mucosa with a thickened appearance. On some frames, patches of mucosa look eroded with no villi surrounded by thickened/irregular mucosa that looks nodular. There are rare scattered dilated lacteals seen. The appearance of the mucosa remains irregular throughout the SI, but the severity of the changes lessens as the capsule passes distally.
    -Colon: the colonic mucosa is partially obscured by yellow mucoid feces, however, areas with erosion and suspect previous hemorrhage can be seen. The mucosa looks irregular in areas and pale round lesions can be seen in two areas.

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#6_Img1_normal esophagusNormal Esophagus
    CaseStudy#6_Img2_nodular area in gastric mucosaNodular Area in Gastric Mucosa
    CaseStudy#6_Img3_irregular gastric mucosaIrregular Gastric Mucosa
    CaseStudy#6_Img4_gastric erosion_ulcer or hematomaGastric Erosion Ulcer or Hematoma
    CaseStudy#6_Img5_irregular duodenal mucosaIrregular Duodenal Mucosa
    CaseStudy#6_Img6_suspect eroded SI mucosa surrounded by irregular_thickened mucosaSuspect Eroded SI Mucosa Surrounded by Irregular Thickened Mucosa
    CaseStudy#6_Img7_irregular SI mucosa with a few dilated lactealsIrregular SI Mucosa With a Few Dilated Lacteals
    CaseStudy#6_Img8_colonic erosionsColonic Erosions
  • 11 y.o. MC West Highland White Terrier with Vocalization

    History:

    -Acute vocalization and restlessness especially when fed
    -Occasional regurgitation
    -Normal appetite
    -Diet: Maintenance
    -No response to H2 blocker or bland diet
    -Medications: no response to H2 blocker or bland diet

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Normal
    Chemistry Panel: Normal
    Survey spinal radiographs: Normal
    Esophagram: Normal

    Problem list:

    -Vocalization and restlessness possibly exacerbated by feeding
    -Occasional regurgitation

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Images: 22,035
    -Study Time: 14.2h
    -Esophageal transit time: 5 sec (normal)
    -Gastric transit time: 5.2h (prolonged)
    -SI transit time: 1.8h (normal)

     

    Findings:
    -Stomach: Prolonged gastric transit time.
    -Numerous gastric erosions with signs of active hemorrhage and irregular mucosa.
    -Small intestine: Proximal duodenum mildly erythematous and mildly irregular mucosa.
    -Several tapeworms are present in the mid-SI.
    -Colon: Obscured by feces. Visible mucosa normal.

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#7_Img1_irregular gastric mucosaIrregular Gastric Mucosa
    CaseStudy#7_Img2_gastric erosionsGastric Erosions
    CaseStudy#7_Img3_tapewormsTapeworms
    CaseStudy#7_Img4_mildly irregular small intestinal mucosaIrregular Small Intestinal Mucosa
  • 5 y.o. MC Mixed Breed with NSAID Overdose

    History:

    -Hematochezia for the past week after owner inadvertently gave her own Naproxan for 2.5 days
    -Hematemesis the day prior to presentation
    -Medications: pantoprazole, metronidazole, metoclopramide, maropitant

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Anemia (Hct 27.3%, reticulocytes 28,600), Neutrophilia, leukocytosis
    Chemistry panel: Hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia
    Ultrasound: Normal wall layering of stomach and SI, slightly decreased motility

    Problem list:

    -Hematemesis
    -NSAID overdose
    -Hematochezia

    ALICAM Results

    -Study Image: 36,271
    -Study Time: 15h
    -Esophageal transit time: 6 sec (normal)
    -Gastric transit time: minimum of 15h (severely prolonged)
    -SI transit time: N/A

     

    Findings:

    -Stomach: large amount of fluid and moderate amount of dark brown material withnumerous ulcers/erosions and evidence of active bleeding.

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#8_Img1_gastric erosions_ulcersGastric Erosions Ulcers
    CaseStudy#8_Img2_gastric erosionsGastric Erosions
  • 7 y.o. MC Airedale with Chronic Vomiting and Diarrhea

    History:

    -Vomiting and small bowel diarrhea for 3 months
    -Only improvement is when fed only rice water
    -Diet: Homemade novel protein
    -Medications: no response to metronidazole, convenia, maropitant, famotidine, diphenhydramine or drontal

    Diagnostics:

    CBC: Normal
    Chemistry panel: Panhypoproteinemia, UPC normal, Ultrasound: normal
    Ultrasound: Normal

    Problem list:

    Chronic vomiting and small bowel diarrhea with panhypoproteinemia, suspect PLE

    ALICAM Results

    -Gastric transit time: 57 mins (normal)
    -SI transit time: 1.9h (normal)

     

    Findings:

    -Stomach: Diffusely moderately to markedly irregular/cobblestone appearing
    -Small intestine: Moderately irregular proximal duodenum with rare dilated lacteals.
    -Themid-SI has moderate to marked irregularity and thickening with numerous dilatedlacteals.
    -Mild-moderate mucosal irregularity and lacteal dilation is seen in the distalSI/ileum.
    -Colon: Obscured by feces

     

    Recommendations: View PDF Report

    CaseStudy#9_Img1_irregular gastric mucosa
    Irregular Gastric Mucosa
    CaseStudy#9_Img2_irregular duodenal mucosa
    Irregular Duodenal Mucosa
    CaseStudy#9_Img3_markedly irregular and thickened mucosa with dilated lacteals
    Markedly Irregular and Thickened Mucosa With Dilated Lacteals
    CaseStudy#9_Img4_markedly irregular SI mucosa with dilated lacteals
    Markedly Irregular SI Mucosa With Dilated Lacteals
    CaseStudy#9_Img5_irregular distal SI mucosa with a few dilated lacteals
    Irregular Distal SI Mucosa With a Few Dilated Lacteals

2017 Lectures

Conference Title Presenter Date
2017 ACVIM Forum
National Harbor, MD
Focus on Gastroenterology: Advanced Imaging and Interventions (Lecture and Workshop) Drs. Jill Pomrantz and Jonathan Lidbury June 10
Imaging in GI Disease: Beyond Radiographs and Ultrasound Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 9
Capsule Endoscopy Findings in Dogs with Hypoalbuminemia Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 8 & 9
Equine Research Report: Capsule Endoscopy(ALICAM) in Horses: Assessing Gastrointestinal Tract Transit Time, Image Quality and Lesions Dr. Renaud Léguillette June 8
Identification of Jejunal Lesions in Dogs Using Capsule Endoscopy Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 8
Hong Kong Training Session Capsule endoscopy: A New and Minimally Invasive Diagnostic Approach to GI Disease Dr. Sarit Dhupa May 2
BSAVA 2017 The use of capsule endoscopy alongside abdominal ultrasonography in an 11-year-old Flat-coated Retriever Dr. Katie Ford April 7

2016 Lectures

Conference Title Presenter Date
London Vet Conference Introduction to Ambulatory Light-Based Imaging (ALI) Dr. John Thomason Nov 17
WWVC 2016 NSAIDs and Gastrointestinal Side Effects Dr. John Thomason Oct 14
Reno, NV IBD and Immunosuppressive Therapy: When and What Dr. John Thomason Oct 14
Management of Chronic Diarrhea in the Dog Dr. John Thomason Oct 14
Gastrointestinal Therapies: When and What Dr. John Thomason Oct 14
CVC Kansas 2016
Kansas City, MO
GI Bleeding and Newer Technology Dr. Mike Willard Aug 28
AVMA 2016
San Antonio, TX
GI Bleeding and Newer Technology Dr. Mike Willard Aug 7
VES Meeting
Jacksonhole, WY
ALICAM Findings in Dogs with Gastrointestinal Signs and a Normal Gastrointestinal Tract on Ultrasound Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 14
Utility of ALICAM in the Identification and Localization of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Dogs Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 14
Feasibility of Measuring Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Healthy Dogs Using ALICAM Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 12
Comparison of Gastric Transit Time in Healthy Dogs and Dogs With Signs of Gastric Hypomotility Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 12
Assessment of Feasibility and Image Quality Using a Novel Gastrointestinal Imaging Device in Client-Owned Dogs Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 12
2016 ACVIM Forum
Denver, CO
ALICAM and Gastrointestinal Disease in Dogs (Three Parts) Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 11
Utility of ALICAM in the Identification and Localization of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Dogs
Visualization of the Duodenal Papilla Using ALICAM Compared to Conventional Duodenoscopy in Dogs
ALICAM Findings in Dogs with Gastrointestinal Signs and a Normal Gastrointestinal Tract on Ultrasound
Feasibility of Measuring Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Healthy Dogs Using ALICAM Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 10
Comparison of Gastric Transit Time in Healthy Dogs and Dogs With Signs of Gastric Hypomotility Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 10
Feasibility of a Novel Gastrointestinal Imaging Device for use in Dogs Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 10
GI Bleeding and Newer Technology Dr. Mike Willard June 10
Scientific Session: Endoscopic Intervention and Gastrointestinal Imaging: The Human Perspective Dr. Michael Kochman June 10
Normal and Abnormal Findings in the Canine GI Tract Using Ambulatory Light-Based Imaging Dr. Jill Pomrantz June 9
AAHA 2016
Austin, TX
Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Are You Missing It? Update On the Diagnostic Approach and Treatment in Dogs Dr. Jonathan Lidbury Mar 16

2015 Lectures

Conference Title Presenter Date
WWVC 2015 GI Ulceration and Hematemesis Dr. John Thomason Oct 8
Reno, NV Protein Losing Enteropathies in Dogs Dr. John Thomason Oct 8
Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Dr. John Thomason Oct 8

A happy client is a good client

With ALICAM, you can offer your clients a cost-effective solution that yields illustrative diagnostic results without any harm to their dogs. What makes ALICAM truly remarkable is that it simply makes imaging easier. While being imaged, the patient can walk out of the clinic and go about its day with no interruption.

A picture is worth a
thousand words

Nothing is more compelling than being able to show a client an abnormality. Clients tend to be more compliant with treatments and more willing to pursue additional tests or therapies when they can see the problem. Alternatively, normal images provide peace of mind. ALICAM is a win-win proposition for clients.

Enhanced practice opportunities

When you use ALICAM, it is like having instant access to an imaging center. You will be able to incorporate diagnostic imaging in the work-up of patients, develop imaging algorithms and have access to expert treatment recommendations. This enhances your bottom line and improves the care you can offer.

Easy to implement

Because Infiniti Medical can perform the reading analysis for you, no special training is required to use ALICAM. Once the images are analyzed, you will receive detailed visual evidence and insightful clinical recommendations tailored for each case. The cutting edge technology built into ALICAM means that there is no need to purchase expensive equipment or worry about anesthesia to perform a study.

A happy client is a good client

With ALICAM, you can offer your clients a cost-effective solution that yields illustrative diagnostic results without any harm to their dogs. What makes ALICAM truly remarkable is that it simply makes imaging easier. While being imaged, the patient can walk out of the clinic and go about its day with no interruption.

A picture is worth a
thousand words

Nothing is more compelling than being able to show a client an abnormality. Clients tend to be more compliant with treatments and more willing to pursue additional tests or therapies when they can see the problem. Alternatively, normal images provide peace of mind. ALICAM is a win-win proposition for clients.

Enhanced practice opportunities

When you use ALICAM, it is like having instant access to an imaging center. You will be able to incorporate diagnostic imaging in the work-up of patients, develop imaging algorithms and have access to expert treatment recommendations. This enhances your bottom line and improves the care you can offer.

Easy to implement

Because Infiniti Medical can perform the reading analysis for you, no special training is required to use ALICAM. Once the images are analyzed, you will receive detailed visual evidence and insightful clinical recommendations tailored for each case. The cutting edge technology built into ALICAM means that there is no need to purchase expensive equipment or worry about anesthesia to perform a study.

Have more questions?

Reach out, and one of our team members will get in touch.